Free from

Credits: Johannah Doll on Flickr

Free from what?

In the formulation of our products, we have excluded certain substances that, although not incriminated by the international scientific community, in our opinion contain elements of dubious value.

The reasons that led us to exclude these ingredients have no scientific basis since they are not backed-up by due experimentation. Nevertheless, we have chosen to exclude them since we believe that the opposite, their effectiveness, has not been sufficiently proven, either. 
We relied on our sensibility and on that of our consultants, who have endorsed and agreed with our decision, as well as on the opinions of dermatologists who are the harbingers of state-of-the-art messages.
It was not easy, we complicated things for ourselves in the formulation of our products, however we followed our hearts and we have created a line of HUMAN & ANIMAL Friendly. We’ll let you be the judge of our work :)

Here are our choices:

MINERAL OILS

NO

PETROLATUM

NO

SILICONES

NO

PARABENS

NO

ETHANOLAMINES

NO

PEG

NO

SLES

NO

FRAGRANCES*

YES

PHTALATES

NO

SYNTHETIC DYES

NO

POLYCYCLIC MUSKS

NO

WHEAT/GLUTEN

NO

GMO

NO


*100% natural essences 


In addition

NO - Ingredients of animal origin
NO - Animal testing of the finished product (prohibited by European Directive n.2003/15/EC)
NO - Animal tests of the individual ingredients (prohibited by European Directive n.2003/15/EC)
YES - None of the ingredients are of animal origin and most of them are from organic farming
YES - Love, passion, trust and sharing




Petrolatum, Mineral Oils, Vaseline, Paraffinum Liquidum

(Petrolatum, Mineral Oils, Vaseline, Paraffinum Liquidum): these ingredients have a high filming abilities and give an immediate feeling of softness and smoothness after use. They consist of oily substances that waterproof the skin and exerting a dehydrating action; however, in doing so they prevent the normal transpiration of the skin and, therefore, proper oxygenation. This results in the possible clogging of pores and the consequential formation of blackheads and imperfections. 

back on top



Silicones

(Cyclomethicone, Cyclopentasiloxane, Cyclohexassiloxane, Dimethicone): there are many characteristics that make them well-known and used, most notably their ability not to penetrate the skin, thereby avoiding allergies. Unlike plant-based creams, silicones are not greasy, giving the skin a smooth and soft feel, they are water repellent and increase the effect of sunscreens. The use of silicones is replacing plant-based emollients that, instead, have the characteristic of deeply nourishing the skin unlike silicones that, as already mentioned, are not absorbed. This failure to be absorbed creates a sort of film that may impede the normal transpiration of the skin, thereby clogging the pores. In the long-run, the skin become dry, asphyxiated, scaly and covered with blackheads and imperfections. The same thing applies to hair. Silicones coat the shaft of the hair making it, only at first glance, silky and shiny, but just as with skin, it is also destined to become stringy and dry.

back on top



PEG and PPG

(Polyethylene Glycol e Polipropylene glycol): these polymers are synthetic derivatives of ethylene oxide, a poisonous gas. Thanks to their remarkable ability to penetrate into the deeper layers of the skin, they become "vehicles" binding several molecules used in cosmetics, thus acting as a driving force for other ingredients. They may cause dermatitis and contact allergies in some individuals.

back on top



Parabens

(metyl-, ethyl-, butyl-, benzyl-, propyl-, paraben): parabens are organic compounds belonging to the p-hydroxybenzoic acid class, hence the name. They are known for their antibacterial and antifungal properties. Parabens are part of a large group of chemicals called xenoestrogens or "endocrine hormones", foreign substances that can mimic estrogen, are potent stimulants for growth and the possible malignant transformation of breast cells. Like other xenoestrogens, once in the human tissue, parabens can remain there for decades, undisturbed and causing disease even after 20-30 years..

back on top



SLS e SLES

(Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, Sodium Laureth Sulfate): these are surfactants, substances necessary to decrease "tension", i.e. the adhesion of particles of dirt and excess fat, allowing their removal with water. They are well-known in the scientific community as the cause of skin irritation, they also increase the absorption of other chemical elements which could lead to a greater absorption of preservatives, fragrances, additives, dyes, etc. There is no scientific proof to demonstrate the toxicity of SLS and SLES; instead, there are many papers on the side effects they are capable of causing. This does not necessarily allow us to consider products containing SLS or SLES as being dangerous, since much depends on their levels of concentration, the other substances involved and the length of time they come into contact with the skin. However, it is important to emphasise that they are two surfactants whose degreasing action, unless balanced by the presence of other, more delicate surfactants, could be too energetic. Also, it should not be forgotten that it is not mandatory to specify the percentage of surfactants contained in products on the labels, which is why you cannot know the levels of concentration.

back on top



Ethanolamines

(DEA, TEA, MEA): this is a colourless liquid or a crystalline alcohol that is used as a solvent, emulsion and detergent. Where found in products containing nitrates, it can trigger a chemical reaction that generates nitrosamines that are potentially carcinogenic. This may also be the case in formulations that exclude nitrates. "DEA" may also irritate the skin and mucous membranes.

back on top



Synthetic dyes

These are used to ensure a uniform colour of products, especially those that contain plant extracts (which are subject to variations in colour from one crop to another). They cost much less that natural dyes, but are suspected of being carcinogens. At present, there are no studies that show this to be the case, but it is best to avoid them. Natural dyes are shown on an international table (Colour Index) and are numerically classified from 75,000 to 75,999.

back on top



Phthalates

(Diethyl Phthalate DEP): diethyl phthalate (DEP) is the only phthalate used in cosmetics sold in Europe. It is added in small quantities to products with the aim of making, any ethyl alcohol which may be present in the cosmetic bitter and, therefore, undrinkable. Diethyl phthalate has been extensively studied and its use has been assessed as safe in cosmetic products. In fact, consumer exposure to this compound through cosmetics is far lower than the levels recognised as hazardous to human health. However, there are studies that confirm the correlation between exposure to phthalates and reproductive problems. Although these studies provide that the incriminated substances must be present in very high concentrations to cause these problems, it is best not to use them.

back on top



Polycyclic musks

(HHCB galaxoside, AHTN tonalide): synthetic musks can be divided into three main classes: aromatic nitro musks, polycyclic musk and macrocyclic musk compounds. The first two groups have found widespread use in the cosmetic and detergent industries. However, the detection of the first two chemical groups in human and environmental samples, as well as their carcinogenicity has sparked a public debate on the use of these compounds and has led to a ban or a reduction of their use in many areas of the world. Research has shown that these compounds do not disperse in the environment, can accumulate in the human body and can break down the immune system against other toxic chemical exposures. Macrocyclic musk compounds should replace the other two types, since they are considered safer.

back on top



Alcohol

(Alcohol): alcohol is a solvent used as a preservative or for the extraction of herbal active ingredients. More specifically, this is ethyl alcohol, or ethanol, derived from plants, which should not be confused with other types of alcohol (cetearyl alcohol, myrisyl alcohol, cetyl alcohol, etc.) which are substances that possess completely different characteristics. Ethanol kills microorganisms by denaturing their proteins and dissolving their lipids and is therefore effective against many bacteria, allowing the avoidance of synthetic preservatives. However, since it denaturises proteins, it overly degreases the skin, making it dry and listless, so its widespread use is not recommended, especially in the more delicate areas, such as the eyes and the intimate areas.

back on top



Wheat/GMO

The significant spread of intolerance to gluten and the rapid expansion of GMO derivatives, which has occurred too quickly to assess possible damage downstream, convinced us to carefully exclude them from our formulations.

back on top